Posts

The impact of personality style on managing remotely

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By Neil Shorney, CEO,  Navanter Knowledge Bites . Time to read: 1 minute. One of the key considerations for managing remotely compared to in person, is the needs of the employee. Many employees have, for over a year, been operating in an environment which is contradictory to their personality style – they took jobs which included the ability to work from an office, yet for 14 months, they’ve been working in isolation. It’s not just the isolation from their colleagues which is causing people stress, but isolation from their managers. There are stories of employees working vastly increased hours and suffering from poor work-life balance, not because of pressure from management, but the need to feel that they’re being seen to be working. Without the ability to check in with their manager around the office, they need to be seen to be present. As leaders, we need to lead these people in a way that is sensitive to their personality styles, and their needs as employees. And as people begin co

Tips to communicate the organisational strategy

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By Neil Shorney, CEO, Navanter Knowledge Bites . Many leadership teams spend a large amount of time developing goals for their businesses, and strategies to achieve those goals. As leaders tend to have larger salaries, and these leaders all get together in the same room (or video call), this time comes at a cost. So we can say that strategy development is an expensive business, especially if you also bring in a consultant to help with the facilitation of those meetings (which, incidentally, is a good idea). So I find it quite depressing when this investment in the organisation’s future is wasted because the strategy is so poorly communicated. It ends up with a business having great, well-thought-through plans, that no-one knows about. I remember doing some work with a company a couple of years ago, for middle managers to work to align their team strategies to the organisational one, and when I arrived in the training room, I was shocked to hear that I knew more about the company’s st

The fourth building block of a culture of creativity and innovation

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I promised you 3 building blocks, but counting never was my strong point, and anyone who's had one too many on a 3-legged bar stool will know that the 4 legs of a chair are safer! My last strategy for you isn’t about creativity as such - it's about ensuring that all the blue sky thinking doesn't bring about some crackpot idea which will sink your organisation. And that's pretty important, isn't it?! By the way, if you’ve not seen the previous 3 posts, do take a look at: Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 You see, if there's 1 barrier to creative thinking in organisations, it's usually from above (you might remember that from yesterday's email) and it's a fear that something new will cause unforseen problems. Whatever ideas your team come up with, they'll most likely need to "sell the dream" to senior management - or perhaps to you! After all your innovative thinking exercises are finished, you could well have a large number of ideas.

The third building block of a creativity culture

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As we reach part 3 of our building blocks of a creativity culture, what have we looked at so far? We've looked at 2 building blocks of a creativity culture:     Encouraging a creativity mindset     Creating the right forum for ideas to come forward I often use an antique camera to encourage creativity (you'll have to come on one of my workshops to learn that one), and as any photographer knows, tripods have 3 legs for a reason: they're just not stable on 2. So my 3rd building block of a creative culture is the tools themselves, and these are vital to enable people to thrive in the environment you've created with the first 2 steps. As people, we have a problem with innovative thinking - we're not very good at it. As children, we're brilliant at this - I see this with envy when I look at my 5 year old. But then we go to school, where we're told that there are right answers and wrong answers. Then we might go to university, where we're told more of the sam

The second building block of a creativity culture

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If you saw last week's post , I hope you’ve got some ideas to influence your team's creativity mindset from the tips in there. Here’s #2 of my 3 building blocks of a creative culture. Too many leaders think that if they ask people to be more creative, it'll just happen. Or they think that getting a group of people into a meeting room together with a whiteboard is the silver bullet to generate innovative ideas. And they're inevitably disappointed when that doesn't work. The problem is, that might work for some people, but it doesn't for everyone. Traditional brainstorming sessions can get dominated by those with stronger personalities. Those who prefer not to be the centre of attention will not take part, and the ideas of those people are never captured. And in the virtual world, it's even easier for people to hide.   Creating the right forum for ideas to flow However, there are some really simple yet effective techniques to ensure not on

3 building blocks of a creativity culture

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If you're looking to create a culture of creativity, I like to think of 3 vital building blocks as a foundation of your success.  Here's #1 of my 3 building blocks of creativity, and it's around fostering the right mindset in employees. Because, you see, it's so easy, in our busy world, to "teach" people the wrong behaviours. What do I mean by that? Well, imagine you're in the office (or the virtual office), having a really busy day. You have a to-do list as long as your arm, and someone comes up to you to ask you something.      Excuse me Neil, how should I... (whatever the problem is)? What do you do? You look at your watch, look at your to-do list, and then give the person the answer to their question. You probably give that answer pretty comprehensively, because you really don't want them disturbing you again 5 minutes later. But there's a problem here - you've just taught that person something. And it's not just the answer to their que

Delivering Effective Virtual Training part 5: Materials & Design #infographic

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By Neil Shorney , Director, Navanter Knowledge Bites. Here's the last part of our infographic series on virtual training. Today's post is some tips about how materials can engage people. If you've missed the previous installments, you'll find them here: Room layout Posture & camera position Tone of voice Interaction If you want to create and deliver virtual training that engages the learners, differentiates you from the competition, and can be even better than face-to-face, check out the following options: How To Deliver Effective Virtual Training course Advanced Facilitation Techniques For Virtual Training course Or just contact me to bounce some ideas around Navanter Knowledge Bites: Virtual training that works .