Posts

Diriger une équipe par tâche

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Par Neil Shorney, PDG de  Navanter Knowledge Bites . Temps de lecture: 2 minutes. Lors de la gestion à distance, la clé du succès est la gestion par tâche. Les employés, en particulier les plus jeunes, mais pas exclusivement, ont besoin de sentir que leurs efforts sont remarqués. Mais quand eux-mêmes ou le responsable travaillent à distance, cela devient un problème, car ils ne se sentent pas remarqués, à moins que le responsable ne prenne des mesures supplémentaires pour montrer son appréciation ou son intérêt pour son travail quotidien. En gérant par tâche, plutôt que de s'appuyer sur la communication générale du bureau, les gestionnaires peuvent donner aux employés un sentiment beaucoup plus grand que leurs efforts ont été remarqués. Que signifie «gérer par tâche»? Cela signifie baser une grande partie (mais pas la totalité) du temps d'interaction sur des tâches à accomplir. Cela signifie s’intéresser davantage à la progression d’un employé dans une tâche, plutôt que de simp

Comment diriger diverses personnalités à distance

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Par Neil Shorney, PDG de Navanter Knowledge Bites . Temps de lecture: 1 minute. L'une des principales considérations pour la gestion à distance par rapport à en personne, ce sont les besoins de l'employé. De nombreux employés travaillent depuis plus d'un an dans un environnement qui est en contradiction avec leur style de personnalité - ils ont accepté des emplois qui incluaient la possibilité de travailler dans un bureau, mais depuis 14 mois, ils travaillent de manière isolée. Ce n’est pas seulement l’isolement de leurs collègues qui cause le stress des gens, mais aussi l’isolement de leurs gestionnaires. Il y a des histoires d'employés qui travaillent beaucoup plus d'heures et souffrent d'un mauvais équilibre entre la vie professionnelle et la vie privée, non pas à cause de la pression de la direction, mais du besoin de sentir qu'ils sont perçus comme travaillant. Sans la possibilité de s'enregistrer avec leur responsable dans le bureau, ils doivent êt

Navanter Knowledge Bites goes carbon positive

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 If you're anything like me, then carbon positive is a new term for you. I first came across it a couple of months ago and wondered what it  meant. As I was looking into it, I discovered that carbon positive is like carbon neutral on steroids. If a business is carbon positive, it means that it removes more carbon from the atmosphere than it contributes. It can't have escaped your notice that the environment has become a really big deal recently. At Navanter, we've been conscious of our environmental obligations, as citizens of the world, for a long time. We've always had a "low carbon" approach to business. We were founded in 2011, and already by 2012, we were offering our clients virtual training (yes - even before covid) as a way of minimising the carbon footprint of the training industry. It caught on early, with some global players (such as Informa plc) embracing the idea of virtual training with us to save on travel. And when travel is  necessary, train h

Tasking: The key to remote management

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By Neil Shorney, CEO,  Navanter Knowledge Bites . Time to read: 1 minute. When managing remotely, the key to success is managing by task. Employees, particularly junior ones but not exclusively, need to feel that their efforts are being noticed. But when either they or the manager are working remotely, this becomes a problem, because they don’t feel noticed, unless the manager takes extra steps to show appreciation or interest in their day-to-day work. By managing by task, rather than relying on general office communication, managers can give employees a much greater sense that their efforts have been noticed. What does “managing by task” mean? It means basing a lot (but not all) of interaction time on tasks that need to be completed. It means taking a greater interest in an employee’s progress through a task, rather than just acknowledging completion. And it means offering the right level of support throughout the duration of a task. The key for the manager is to set tasks at the righ

The impact of personality style on managing remotely

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By Neil Shorney, CEO,  Navanter Knowledge Bites . Time to read: 1 minute. One of the key considerations for managing remotely compared to in person, is the needs of the employee. Many employees have, for over a year, been operating in an environment which is contradictory to their personality style – they took jobs which included the ability to work from an office, yet for 14 months, they’ve been working in isolation. It’s not just the isolation from their colleagues which is causing people stress, but isolation from their managers. There are stories of employees working vastly increased hours and suffering from poor work-life balance, not because of pressure from management, but the need to feel that they’re being seen to be working. Without the ability to check in with their manager around the office, they need to be seen to be present. As leaders, we need to lead these people in a way that is sensitive to their personality styles, and their needs as employees. And as people begin co

Tips to communicate the organisational strategy

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By Neil Shorney, CEO, Navanter Knowledge Bites . Many leadership teams spend a large amount of time developing goals for their businesses, and strategies to achieve those goals. As leaders tend to have larger salaries, and these leaders all get together in the same room (or video call), this time comes at a cost. So we can say that strategy development is an expensive business, especially if you also bring in a consultant to help with the facilitation of those meetings (which, incidentally, is a good idea). So I find it quite depressing when this investment in the organisation’s future is wasted because the strategy is so poorly communicated. It ends up with a business having great, well-thought-through plans, that no-one knows about. I remember doing some work with a company a couple of years ago, for middle managers to work to align their team strategies to the organisational one, and when I arrived in the training room, I was shocked to hear that I knew more about the company’s st

The fourth building block of a culture of creativity and innovation

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I promised you 3 building blocks, but counting never was my strong point, and anyone who's had one too many on a 3-legged bar stool will know that the 4 legs of a chair are safer! My last strategy for you isn’t about creativity as such - it's about ensuring that all the blue sky thinking doesn't bring about some crackpot idea which will sink your organisation. And that's pretty important, isn't it?! By the way, if you’ve not seen the previous 3 posts, do take a look at: Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 You see, if there's 1 barrier to creative thinking in organisations, it's usually from above (you might remember that from yesterday's email) and it's a fear that something new will cause unforseen problems. Whatever ideas your team come up with, they'll most likely need to "sell the dream" to senior management - or perhaps to you! After all your innovative thinking exercises are finished, you could well have a large number of ideas.